cactuswatcher: (Default)
( May. 24th, 2017 06:15 pm)
I think somewhere I mentioned the subject of book I read through most recently. It is The Fall of the Ottomans by Eugene Rogan, which covers the years between 1908 and the armistice on October 31, 1918 ending Turkey's participation in World War One, eleven days before the armistice on the Western Front. Not sure anyone here is interested in that subject, but I should say it is balanced, well written and easy to follow. I've read a couple books on the Ottomans before, the excellent The Ottoman Centuries by Patrick Balfour, 3rd Baron Kinross, which covered the entire sweep of Ottoman history and another book I don't recall well that also focused on the Ottomans in World War One, but without the clarity of The Fall of the Ottomans.

The book manages to relate the problems Turks had without painting them as 'the enemy,' but also not ignoring the ugly side of Young Turk rule. The book explains why the Armenian genocide began, who was behind it in government, and some of the horrors, but it does not let that topic overwhelm the rest of the history. It does cover the double dealing on the part of the British in the war who seemed to have made promises to far too many groups, tribes and nations with conflicting interests. It does however show without actually arguing the point that perhaps those who think that the current troubles in the Middle East began with the British and French occupation after World War One probably haven't dug deeply enough into the issues that were tearing the Ottoman Empire apart long before then.

My only gripe about the book is that it stops in 1918 where as the transition from the Ottomans to the modern Turkey took several more years of fighting.

Currently, I am translating a very long, Soviet era, Russian novel called Blockade by Aleksander Chakovsky, about the siege of Leningrad in World War Two. It seems the book was turned into a movie shortly after it was published in 1978, but it is not easy to find out anything about its author. The book is fine for brushing up on my Russian skills, but it certainly is not one I would recommend to anyone, Russian speaking or not, as a work of art. Among the problems I've seen in it besides the usual Soviet era ideological crap are plagiarism (It's bad when you know the English language sources a Russian book stole from), horrible syntax, and possibly non-existent or possibly terrifyingly bad editing.
.

Profile

cactuswatcher: (Default)
cactuswatcher

Most Popular Tags

Page Summary

Powered by Dreamwidth Studios

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags